Tag: review

‘The Sound of Music’ is full of sweet songs: 1959 review

‘The Sound of Music’ is full of sweet songs: 1959 review

Music & Arts
AgfaScns Mary Martin in The Sound of Music. (Originally published by the Daily News on Nov. 17, 1959. This story was written by John Chapman.) There is much that is admirable, stunning and exciting in “The Sound of Music,” which opened last evening - enough, I am sure, to give this musical play a big audience. But not quite enough to make me as satisfied as I wanted so much to be. I wanted to hear about how the Trapp Family Singers came to this country and started life anew, but the second-act curtain came down before they got around to this part of the story. The music by Richard Rodgers and the lyrics by Oscar Hammerstein 2d are splendid. The production, designed by Oliver Smith, is beautiful. The cast headed by Mary Martin, Theodore Bikel, Patricia Neway, Kurt Kasznar and Marion Marlowe
‘Tightrope’ review: Cold War tale with complex characters

‘Tightrope’ review: Cold War tale with complex characters

Music & Arts
other press "Tightrope" by Simon Mawer is out now from Other Press. “Tightrope” is a bit like a game of chess. It starts out slow and at first the characters feel interchangeable. Then, about a quarter of the way in, it suddenly turns into an intense story with unpredictable moving pieces that seem headed for a tragic fate. The chess-like feel is apt for the new Simon Mawer novel, as the game becomes a recurring metaphor weaving its way throughout the book. Released Tuesday, “Tightrope” opens in the present day, when Samuel — the narrator — pays a visit to the book’s central character, an aging family friend (and former crush) named Marian Sutro. “The whole damn story,” Samuel warns us, “is riddled with clichés, heroine being one of them. Traitor being another.” From that ominous introduct
'Star Wars Battlefront: Twilight Company': book review

'Star Wars Battlefront: Twilight Company': book review

Music & Arts
"Star Wars Battlefront: Twilight Company" puts readers on the ground with the soldiers of the Rebel Alliance. A novel that ties in to a video game based on a sprawling sci-fi franchise shouldn't be this good. "Star Wars Battlefront: Twilight Company," the first novel from sci-fi writer Alexander Freed, offers readers an ordinary Rebel Alliance soldier's perspective on the battlefield in the months following the destruction of the first Death Star. We are introduced to the titular infantry unit as it battles on the streets of a backwater world, one of the many small operations that punctuate the novel. These scenes are fast-moving, fun to read and highlight the gritty nature of "Star Wars" conflict without the Force. These soldiers must strike quickly and ruthlessly, which makes a refreshin...
AMD R9 Nano review: Stellar performance in a pint-sized graphics card

AMD R9 Nano review: Stellar performance in a pint-sized graphics card

Gaming
Share This article At E3 this past summer, AMD announced four new GPUs that would make up its next-generation product family: The Radeon Fury X, the Fury, the Fury Nano, and the as-yet-unreleased dual-GPU Fury. We’ve covered each launch in turn, but the R9 Nano (AMD opted to shorten the name) is arguably the pinnacle of the entire Fury family. While it’s not expected to match the Radeon Fury X’s performance, it’s even shorter than the Fury X’s 7.5 inches. At just six inches, the Nano is exactly the same size as a PCIe x16 slot. Any shorter, and AMD would’ve had to compromise on bus bandwidth. The Radeon Nano In person, the card is every bit as impressive as it looks in pictures. At six inches long, it’s actually shorter than the first 3D accelerator I ever bought, the Diamond Monste
The Bonnie review: Great drinks dwarf mediocre food

The Bonnie review: Great drinks dwarf mediocre food

Lifestyle
Barbara Alper/for New York Daily News Shaun Van Alphen is the Chef at The Bonnie restaurant in Astoria, Wednesday, Aug. 19, 2015. (Barbara Alper for New York Daily News) Enlarge Barbara Alper/for New York Daily News The Bonnie restaurant in Astoria makes a Black Jack cocktail, Wednesday, Aug. 19, 2015. (Barbara Alper for New York Daily News) Enlarge Left, The Bonnie's chef, Shaun Van Alphen, with one of his creations. Right, the gastropub's Black Jack cocktail. If you’re going to do a gastropub, you need to get both parts of that right. The Bonnie in Astoria pays more attention to the pub portion, so foodies will have to choose carefully to avoid disappointment. You get a hint of this as soon as you scope out the space: The eatery boasts two fully equipped bars and there are plenty of
‘Star Wars: Aftermath’ reveals never-ending battle: review

‘Star Wars: Aftermath’ reveals never-ending battle: review

Music & Arts
'Star Wars: Aftermath' begins as the dying embers of the second Death Star burn away over Endor and the galaxy celebrates the Empire apparent defeat. The journey to “The Force Awakens” begins at last, with a New Republic rising from the ashes of the Empire. "Star Wars: Aftermath," the first of a trilogy by Chuck Wendig, opens with the familiar image of celebrating crowds on Coruscant toppling the statue of Emperor Palpatine, in our first glimpse at the galaxy after "Return of the Jedi." However, we see that the Imperial threat is far from over when the regime's police open fire on the defiant people, creating a stark contrast with the jubilant ending of the Original Trilogy as the conflict continues. The novel then flashes forward to a few months later, with former Rebel Alliance pilot Wed

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